Thursday, April 16, 2009

What should I do to help my breech baby turn?

Dear Gail,
I was wondering what yoga position is good to help turn a baby. I have tried laying on a board upside down and my lower back gets really soar. I went to the chiropractor today and she is going to see me [again]. I am wondering what else I can do to turn this baby....


My response,
I've answered this question pretty well on my Spinning Babies Website. Let me tell you how to find it!
Go to Baby Positions and a drop down menu appears. The second link in the drop down menu is "Breech, or Bottoms up." You'll get a lot of information from About Breech.


For twins, use the same 3 Principles of Spinning Babies that you use for a single baby, increase inversion time from 30 seconds to 2 minutes or up to 20 minutes. But I'd suggest 2-5 minutes and repeat the inversions up to 3 times a day until you feel your baby kicking in the top of your uterus.

I don't recommend any particular yoga positions, for instance, I don't believe that down dog is a key position. Look to positions that balance the pelvis, especially the pelvic floor. Balance, whether through yoga, body work or repeated body balancing exercises and techniques will help baby's flip head down.

Chance to promote midwifery

Senator Berglin's Birth Center Bill if passed, would provide the most amazing opportunity to promote midwifery that this nation has ever experienced.

While physicians can certainly establish and/or work at birth centers, the birth center is commonly associated with midwifery care. We have about 300 midwives of both CNM and CPM credentials. About 50 of these midwives attend now, or have attended, homebirths in Minnesota.

Should the bill pass, the appearance of many birth centers in our state would make many midwives needed here.
The first birth center, Morning Star Womens' Health and Birth Center, opens June of 2009 in St. Louis Park, MN. The new birth center is independent of the bill and opens coincidentally. Several midwives are needed now. Paula is looking for midwives with out-of-hospital birth experience.

Out-of-hospital birth experience will not be required at most of the birth centers that would arise with the passage of the bill. Midwives could come out of a school setting and begin working in a birth center. Midwives could also choose to leave hospital practice and work in a birth center.

There will be a wide variety of midwifery philosophy and so therefore, styles of care. Parents will choose birth centers, either because their insurance covers that birth center, or because they sought a center that matches their vision of birth. Expectant parents might also attend parent meetings, such as the Parent Topic Nights of the Childbirth Collective or Northland Birth Network, to hear other parents and doulas speak about their birth center experiences just as they do now to hear of both hospital and homebirth practices.

Competition among birth places

The new Birth Center Bill is gaining grumpy support. Grumpy, because though hospital birth practitioners support Senator Berglin's bill there is a lot of behind scenes gossip that having birth centers will take the patients from area hospitals. Hospitals are concerned about loss of income.

Even hospitals compete with each other as noted in this article:

Park Nicollet doctors won't work at new Maple Grove hospital

Its doctors won't see patients there

Park Nicollet announced Wednesday that its doctors will not care for patients at a competing hospital in Maple Grove when it opens this year.

A statement from the health system listed better care as a reason ...

Unmentioned in the statement was the financial incentive for Park Nicollet — which like many health systems is laying off staff and taking other steps to curb economic woes — to keep its patients in-house.


There will be a change in birth once birth centers are set up in every county of the state. Healthy women will be able to choose to give birth in a setting that emphasizes normal birth. What a relief to be cared for by midwives and physicians who see birth as a normal event, not as an emergency needing expensive management.

The first birth center to open will be right in the Methodist Hospital neighborhood - Paula Bernini Feigal is opening a new Morning Star Women's Health and Birthing Center on Excelsior Blvd in St. Louis Park walking distance from Methodist.

Paula may not get many referrals from Methodist medical staff at first, but once birth centers become the norm, it will seem reasonable and right to care for women who are ill, have risks, or who desire to be numbed for birth and refer healthy women who want a more active involvement in their birth to the birth centers.

Women who have to pay out of pocket for their births may choose the lower cost birth care at birth centers. Many women, women who wish to, but don't Have to, will find birth center birth supportive of early family adjustment, breastfeeding, and women centered birth. To compete, hospitals are likely to begin listening more to birthing women. Competition in a free market can promote improvement in services.

Monday, April 13, 2009

Reducing the Cesarean Rate


One of the ways to reduce the Cesarean rate is with the Pelvic Floor Release. The pelvic floor is a strong bowl of muscles that has a front-to-back opening for the baby to go through. A crooked or tight pelvic floor lengthens the birth, increases OP position and Asynclitism (tipped head).

See the new article on how to do the Pelvic Floor Release under Techniques, at the Spinning Babies Website.

The Twin Cities Chapter of the International Cesarean Awareness Network has a great site with a map of where VBACs are supported in Minnesota hospitals. I'm heading over to the Twin Cities ICAN meeting tonight at 6:30 pm for a meet the midwives night.

By the way, today, April 13 is the date on which I attended my first birth 30 years ago. 1979...

Changing the Earth by supporting Birth

Mothers bring forth life; medical corporations do not. Birth can be simple, powerful and loving. Fetal positioning, natural birthing and practical help for normal birth.