Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Planned birth benefits and risks

Women today are sometimes encouraged to finish pregnancy and have their babies delivered.
The suggestion can create a sense that induction or a cesarean is the route to safety. For many pregnant people the alternative of continuing the pregnancy until nature decides the birthday no longer feels natural or safe.

But what are the actual risks? Here is an Australian study looking at the results of delivery baby with technology.

Planned births occur where a considered decision is made to deliver an infant, and in recent years there have been significant changes in clinical practice resulting in an increase in planned births before the ideal time of birth at 39-40 weeks' gestation. This is mostly attributable to the increased use of elective caesarean section and induction of labour.
The study of 153,000 Australian children published today in Pediatrics reports that overall, 9.6 per cent of children were developmentally high risk. In particular, infants born following planned birth before the optimal time of birth were more likely to have poor child development.
Using the Australian Early Development Census instrument, children in the study were assessed in five domains: physical health and wellbeing, language and cognition, social competence, emotional maturity, and general knowledge and communication.
Children scoring in the bottom 10 per cent of these domains were considered 'developmentally vulnerable', and children who were 'developmentally vulnerable' on two or more domains were classified as 'developmentally high risk'.
Compared to children born vaginally following spontaneous labor, the combined adjusted relative risk of being 'developmentally high risk' was 26 per cent higher for a planned birth at 37 weeks and 13 per cent higher at 38 weeks. This is after taking account other important factors associated with poor child development such as socioeconomic disadvantage, lower maternal age, maternal smoking in pregnancy and fetal growth restriction.
"The timing of planned birth is potentially modifiable, and the benefits of waiting should be communicated to clinicians, mothers and families," says study co-author, Dr Jonathan Morris of the Kolling Institute and the University of Sydney.
The study also reports that the risk of being 'developmentally vulnerable' increased with decreasing gestational age.
Compared to children with a gestational age of 40 weeks, the adjusted relative risk of being 'developmentally high risk' was 25 per cent higher at 32-33 weeks, 26 per cent higher at 34-36 weeks, 17 per cent higher at 37 weeks, and six per cent higher at 38 weeks.

No comments:

Changing the Earth by supporting Birth

Mothers bring forth life; medical corporations do not. Birth can be simple, powerful and loving. Fetal positioning, natural birthing and practical help for normal birth.